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Cheap wash can prove expensive

Question : THE engine of my six-month-old Toyota Vios needs washing due to an oil spill.

I'm thinking of going to a roadside car wash as it's cheaper. But friends say that should water enter certain engine components during washing, the engine can malfunction and eventually require expensive repairs.

Answer : USING electronic components to reduce exhaust pollution and maintenance cost is commonplace these days. In fact, cars now hardly use traditional mechanical metering of fuel using carburetors and the ignition distributor to control ignition. Instead, fuel and ignition are controlled by a single module known as the Electronic Control Unit (ECU).

Electronic components are very sensitive to static electricity and moisture due the extremely small currents that flow through their circuitry. Any minor disruption is likely to result in a malfunction. So no moisture should enter any of the electronic circuitry under any circumstances.

Washing the engine with a pressure washer would certainly result in moisture entering the electronic components, unless they are protected in the first place.

I suggest you take your vehicle to your local authorised Toyota workshop for cleaning, even though it may cost more. 

 
   
 

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