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Static current woe

Question : I FOLLOWED your advice as published on June 29 but my problem with static current still persists. I also installed additional wires to the seat but the static current still exists. What if I wrap the seat with other materials, like leather ?

Answer : The effect is actually called the tribo-electric effect in which an electric charge is built up by two different materials in the tribo-electric series.

Skin and leather are close to each other in positive charge in the scale and so will not build up electricity.

Some positive materials are nylon, wool and even human hair.

Some common negative charged materials are lucite, amber, sealing wax, acrylic, polystyrene, resins, hard rubber, nickel, copper, sulphur, polyester, polyurethane, polyethylene, polypropylene, PVC, Teflon, silicone rubber, etc.

So you can see that when you have two opposing materials rubbing or even touching each other, a charge can be built up and you can get a shock.

What you need to do is go through a process of elimination to find out the materials that are causing the problem. Earthing can help but eliminating the cause is even better.

 
 

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